So Who’s Ranked The Best U.S. President Of All Time?

Published on 12/10/2018
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Can You Guess Who The Greatest POTUS Was?


Despite all of our political differences, there are certain American politicians who have managed to win us over. C-SPAN hired a group of experts to find out who was the best POTUS in the eyes of the public. They used criteria like leadership skills during crisis, public persuasion abilities, and skills at international relations to determine the answer. They have combed our history from 1774 to seek out the greatest leader to have headed the country. Do you think your favorite president made the cut? Read on to find out!

Warren G. Harding

The 29th election, which Warren G. Harding ended up winning, was a significant milestone since it was the first one in which women could participate. Before he became the president, Harding actually worked in the media as the owner of the Ohio newspaper called the Marion Star. He left his hometown to go into the politics when it became necessary. During his time in office, he announced that the US was at finally at peace with Austria, Germany, and Hungary. He also tried to reinstate normalcy with attempts at improving the economy. During a time of controversy, Harding suffered a fatal heart attack as the scandals were becoming more visible.

Warren G. Harding

Warren G. Harding

John Tyler

After the death of William Henry Harrison, John Tyler succeeded him as the 10th President of the United States. He became the first person to take over the administration after the death of the incumbent president, and he was in office from 1841 to 1845. When it came to the question of slavery, Tyler took a rather “passive” stance by letting the states decide for themselves. He made a number of enemies in the government, and he was even dubbed “His Accidency.” They attempted to overthrow him, the first attempted impeachment in US history, though they did not succeed. Tyler also conducted treaty negotiations with China and Britain.

John Tyler

John Tyler

Franklin Pierce

The 14th President of the United States was considered to be, to say the least, a controversial person. He criticized the abolitionist movement by calling it “a fundamental threat to the unity of the nation.” During his term, the Kansas-Nebraska act was put in place, and this allowed the residents of new territories to make the decision to criminalize slavery. Aside from this, he was also quite the alcoholic, something he allegedly got from his mother.

Franklin Pierce

Franklin Pierce

James Buchanan

After Franklin Pierce’s time in the office, James Buchanan took his place. A fellow democrat, historians believed he did not actually make a lot of improvements. It is therefore quite ironic to find out that he once claimed he wanted to achieve the same level of excellence George Washington did. On another note, he had ten brothers and sisters.

James Buchanan

James Buchanan

William Henry Harrison

William Henry Harrison is known as the US president with the shortest time in office. He only held on to the position for 31 days, from March 4, 1841 until April 4, 1841. He succumbed to pneumonia after a rainy inauguration day. The 9th President of the United States was the last head of state to have witnessed the American Revolution, and he actually earned his fame when he led the military to victory in battle in 1811. The Battle of Tippecanoe victory gave him the moniker “Old Tippecanoe.” He was also the first president to have been photographed, though the image has not been recovered. He is the son of Benjamin Harrison, and his own grandson of the same name became the 23rd POTUS.

William Henry Harrison

William Henry Harrison

Millard Fillmore

Millard Fillmore was the last president hailing from the defunct Whig Party. It is fascinating to learn he grew up in a poor family and took it upon himself to study hard. He eventually became the vice president under Zachary Taylor’s administration. After the 12th President died of cholera, Fillmore succeeded him, though it was not easy. When he entered office, the entire cabinet resigned so he had to establish a new one from scratch. He signed the Compromise of 1850 in an effort to alleviate tensions between the North and the South, though this failed. When it comes to international relations, he helped develop a relationship with Japan, who was only beginning to open up again after a period of isolation.

Millard Fillmore

Millard Fillmore

Herbert Hoover

The 31st President of the United States was in office during a particularly challenging time in history. Herbert Hoover hailed from Iowa and Oregon but matriculated at Stanford University where he met his wife Lou Henry. He spent some time in China before he launched a political career, and he also lived in Europe during the Great War. He became famous when he helped evacuate hundreds of thousands of American tourists from France and Germany. He was in office from 1929 until 1933, which coincided with the stock market crash and the beginning of the Great Depression. In the midst of the challenges, Hoover tried many methods to improve the economic situation by lowering taxes and asking businesses to keep employees.

Herbert Hoover

Herbert Hoover

Chester Arthur

Chester Arthur was born in Vermont to Irish parents. The 21st President of the United States received many comments about “looking like a president” even before his term, though this only became true when President James Garfield was assassinated in 1881. As the vice president, he took over the presidency and one of his most significant moves was enacting the Pendleton Act, which ensured that government jobs were awarded via a merit-based system instead of political affiliations and relations. He also legislated a federal immigration law that aimed to halt the immigration of “paupers, criminals, and lunatics.”

Chester Arthur

Chester Arthur

Martin Van Buren

President Martin Van Buren served from 1837 until 1841. His term coincided with the Panic of 1837, an economic crisis that erupted three months into his presidency. It is largely considered to be the first great depression in US history. Van Buren was called ‘the Little Magician’ after he pushed for the independence of the US treasury to prevent corruption. He was the secretary of state under Andrew Jackson before he became the president. Later on, he became the so-called “minister to Great Britain.” Van Buren received some criticism when businesses and banks closed down because of the economic situation. Despite everything, he put into motion efforts to improve the economy, though he never received proper credit as he was no longer president when things started to change for the better.

Martin Van Buren

Martin Van Buren

George W. Bush

George W. Bush was the head of state when the tragic 9/11 attacks happened back in 2001. He served two terms from 2001 until 2008, during which he ordered the second Gulf War in Iraq, as well as the invasion of Afghanistan. He also created the Department of Homeland Security in response to the 9/11 tragedy. Before he won the 2000 presidential race, he was the Texas governor for five years. As the son of former president George H.W. Bush, he is the second US President to be the child of a former president.

George W. Bush

George W. Bush

Bush Hears About 9/11

We will all remember the day it happened – the day the United States suffered terrorist attacks by Al Qaeda. The photograph below shows the moment President Bush was told about the attacks on the World Trade Center towers. He received the news while he was at Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Florida, promoting literacy. Apparently, he even read The Pet Goat to the schoolchildren.

Bush Hears About 9111

Bush Hears About 911

Rutherford B. Hayes

The 19th President of the United States was a Republican who served from 1877 to 1881. Apparently, prominent author Mark Twain was a supporter of his. He was the Ohio governor for three terms before he took over the presidency. He was yet another member of the Whig party. Among other things, he supported the civil rights movement, though the opposition blocked his efforts. He also wanted to ensure fairness in the government and advocated for merit-based applications. Hayes is also credited for developing the Pendleton Act.

Rutherford B. Hayes

Rutherford B. Hayes

Zachary Taylor

The 12th President of the United States Zachary “Old Rough and Ready” Taylor is best known for his short time in office. Before embarking on a political career, he was considered a war hero. He earned his nickname for his leadership skills while he was in the military. He was another leader hailing from the Whig Party. He paid a lot of attention to the slavery debate, reportedly leaning towards the side of the abolitionists despite being a slave-owner. He also encouraged New Mexico and California to join the union. Sadly, he died on July 9, 1850 after a bout with cholera.

Zachary Taylor

Zachary Taylor

Benjamin Harrison

The 23rd President of the United States was in the Union Army in the days of the American Civil War. Benjamin Harrison was great when it comes to international relations, and he had a notable working relationship with Congress when he was in office from 1889 to 1893. During his term, he received the nickname “Little Ben,” in reference to his great grandfather and namesake, the founding father Benjamin Harrison. He was the only president to have been the grandchild of another US President as the grandson of William Henry “Old Tippecanoe” Harrison. Other milestones he achieved during his term were his advocacy of civil rights and accepting Montana, Wyoming, Washington, North Dakota, and South Dakota into the union.

Benjamin Harrison

Benjamin Harrison

James A. Garfield

Did you know that James A. Garfield, the 20th President of the United States, was the only one who first served as a sitting member of the House of Representatives? During the American Civil War, he had been a major general for the Union, and he was present during the Battles of Middle Creek, Shiloh, and Chickamauga. He was able to accomplish a number of admirable things such as improving the navy and getting rid of corruption in the post. Garfield was also an advocate of universal education systems and civil rights, appointing African-Americans like Fredrick Douglass to government positions. Unfortunately, he was only in office for a matter of months as his term was cut short by an assassination attempt that caused numerous infections.

James A. Garfield

James A. Garfield

Garfield’s Assassination

President James A. Garfield had only been the president for four months when Charles J. Guiteau shot him. While he did survive the shooting, he did not live for long after battling multiple infections. If this happened in the present, modern technology and medicine would have helped him recover without a problem.

Garfields Assassination

Garfields Assassination

Richard M. Nixon

A talented negotiator when it comes to foreign affairs, Richard M. Nixon was the President of the United States from 1969 until 1974. During his term, Nixon pulled out the American troops from Vietnam, brought home the POWs, opened relations with China, and negotiated the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with the former USSR. He was the vice president under President Dwight D. Eisenhower back in 1953 to 1961. Nixon definitely had a lot of accomplishments under his belt,, and the list goes on: the signing of the anti-crime bill, launching the “War on Cancer” and funding the Environmental Protection Agency. In 1960, he lost the presidential race to John F. Kennedy, the Democrat candidate. If the Watergate scandal never happened, he would probably have earned a higher spot on the list.

Richard M. Nixon

Richard M. Nixon

Nixon’s Watergate Scandal

When the Watergate scandal broke out, Richard Nixon did the honorable thing and quit from the position. Effectively, he became the first POTUS to have ever resigned. His last statement as president was, “I have always tried to do what is best for the nation.”

Nixons Watergate Scandal

Nixon’s Watergate Scandal

Calvin Coolidge

After the tragic death of President Warren Harding back in 1923, Vice President Calvin Coolidge replaced him. The following year, he was elected the president, and he held onto the position until 1929. He was a fan of both small government and laissez-faire foreign policy so he left the office with great reception from the public, despite the fact that the administration had its fair share of scandal. A naturally soft-spoken person, Coolidge never failed to fight for what he thought was right, especially when it came to racial equality and civil rights. However, the other government officials did not always support his advocacies, such as the time he wanted to make lynching a crime on the federal level. Nonetheless, he was able to pass the Indian Citizenship Act, which granted the native Americans citizenship. His biographer described him in this manner: “He embodied the spirit and hopes of the middle class, could interpret their longings and express their opinions. That he did represent the genius of the average is the most convincing proof of his strength.”

Calvin Coolidge

Calvin Coolidge

Jimmy Carter

As the 39th President of the United States, Jimmy Carter served from 1977 to 1981. He was born and raised in the peanut farming business, and he entered politics while he was building up the family business. When he was POTUS, Carter formed the Department of Education and the Department of Energy. He is also created for the Camp David Accords, which led to the Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty of 1979. C-SPAN reports that he did well when it comes to pursuing justice for all Americans and moral authority. During his term, he had to handle international controversies such as the Iran Hostage Crisis and the 1979 Energy Crisis. These events made the public lose trust in him, and he lost the 1980 presidential race to Ronald Reagan of the Republican Party. In 2002, he won the Nobel Peace prize for the efforts of the NGO, the Carter Center.

Jimmy Carter

Jimmy Carter

Carter’s Peace Deal

Pres. Jimmy Carter will never be forgotten for brokering peace between Egyptian president Anwar Saddat and Israeli president Menachem Begin. The 1978 treaty meant Israel would return land it took during the 1973 Yom Kippur War while Egypt would officially recognize Israel. They received the Nobel Peace Prize for the peace agreement.

Carters Peace Deal

Carters Peace Deal

Gerald R. Ford Jr.

After the resignation of Pres. Nixon, it was Gerald Ford who took his place. The 38th President of the United States was in office from 1974 to 1977. He was known for the Helsinki Accords, which tried to improve relations with the USSR in the middle of the Cold War. He also pardoned his predecessor. A native of Grand Rapids, Michigan, Ford first pursued a law career, and this served as his gateway into politics. He ranks high on the list for the moral authority with which he led the nation through a terrible economic crisis. He also happens to be the only president and vice president who took on the roles without being elected into the positions.

Gerald R. Ford Jr.

Gerald R. Ford Jr.

Ford’s First Assassination Attempt

President Gerald Ford survived an assassination attempt on September 5, 1975. He had been walking through the crowd in Sacramento, California when he was shot at by Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme using a Colt M1911 pistol. Fortunately, the pistol failed to fire and no one was harmed – with the exception of Fromme herself as the Secret Service officers immediately jumped on her. The perpetrator was apparently a Charles Manson follower.

Fords First Assassination Attempt

Fords First Assassination Attempt

Ford’s Second Assassination Attempt

Just two and a half weeks after the first assassination attempt, someone else tried to take his life. Sara Jane Moore tried to shoot him while he was in the middle of another California street tour. A former marine in the crowd immediately noticed when she took out a gun, and he pounced on her right away. While she did shoot a bullet, it hit a cab driver instead of the president. Fortunately, the victim survived the ordeal.

Fords Second Assassination Attempt

Fords Second Assassination Attempt

William H. Taft

William H. Taft was the 27th President of the United States, and he made a name for himself as the only president who went on to become the US Chief of Justice after his term. Hailing from Ohio, Taft studied law at the prestigious Yale University later on. Apparently, he even joined the secret society the Skull and Bones while attending the Ivy League institution. He had a great law career, and he eventually became a judge. He was in office from 1909 until 1913, and his time will forever be known for his efforts on East Asia. He also intervened in Latin America, where he either broke down or set up governments.

William H. Taft

William H. Taft

Grover Cleveland

Grover Cleveland was president for two terms, and he was first in office from 1885 until 1889. He lost the following elections, though he did take back the presidency in 1893 and served until 1897. He received a lot of praise from conservatives for his fiscal policy and political reform advocacy. His second term coincided with the Panic of 1893, as well as the Pullman Strike of 1894. Among other things, Cleveland was excellent at public speaking. His biographer said, “He possessed honesty, courage, firmness, independence, and common sense. But he possessed them to a degree other men do not.”

Grover Cleveland

Grover Cleveland

Cleveland’s Marriage

Did you know that Grover Cleveland was the first and only POTUS who got married at the White House? However, this piece of trivia was overshadowed by the person who married. His wife might have only been 21 years old at the time, but she was adored by the general public. She was charismatic, attractive, and fluent in French. He was 28 years older than her, though everyone could see they truly loved each other.

Clevelands Marriage

Clevelands Marriage

Ulysses S. Grant

As a Union Army commanding general back in the Civil War, Ulysses S. Grant became the 18th President of the United States. He was hugely popular when he was in office from 1869 to 1877. A couple of years after his graduation from West Point, he made a name for himself as a hero in the Mexican-American War. He was the youngest president when he was sworn in at only 47 years old. He ranked high thanks to his moral authority, public persuasion skills, international relations excellence, and pursuit of justice for everyone. He is best remembered as an honest person who opposed the KKK and appointed both African Americans and Jewish Americans to office.

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant

John Quincy Adams

The 6th President of the United States was none other than John Quincy Adams. He was in office from 1825 to 1829. Better known as JQA, he was the son of the founding father and former president John Adams. He was a big pro-equal rights and anti-slavery champion, even calling himself “the acutest, the astutest, the archest enemy of southern slavery that ever existed.” He liked to keep out of European politics as an advocate of nonintervention policies. He also expressed disapproval when it comes to the Texas annexation. He is also the person with the oldest surviving presidential photo – it dates back to 1843 when JQA was 76 years old!

John Quincy Adams

John Quincy Adams

George H. W. Bush

The late George H.W. Bush was the president for one term from 1989 to 1993. His son, President George W. Bush later won the presidency as well. Before his term, the older Bush had already been in the White House for a total of 8 years as the vice president under President Ronald Reagan. He was known for his exemplary leadership skills during crisis. He was also great at international relations and negotiations. When he was in office, the Berlin Wall fell, the Cold War ended, and the first Gulf War erupted. He was credited for several monumental acts including the North American Free Trade Agreement, Americans With Disabilities Act, and the Clean Air Act. Aside from all of these, he also holds the longest presidential marriage that lasted for 73 years! Sadly, he passed away in November of 2018.

George H. W. Bush

George H. W. Bush

John Adams

John Adams is well-known as the 2nd President of the United States. He was in office from 1797 to 1801. The founding father became known as the “father of the American Navy” thanks to his efforts to build up the navy. He also helped resolve a conflict with France, though he lost his reelection bid to Thomas Jefferson.

John Adams

John Adams

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson was in office for a single term from 1829 to 1837. These days, he is widely recognized as the face on the $20 bill. However, this is actually pretty ironic when you consider that he expressed disapproval for paper money and supported the production of gold and silver coins. When he was 13, he was a captive of the British in the Revolutionary War. That’s right, he was the only POTUS who was a POW. He also prevented the secession of South Carolina and paid off all the national debt during his term.

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson’s Inauguration Party

President Andrew Jackson distinguished himself as the president of the regular Joe. After his inauguration, he headed for the executive mansion to attend a small party that was attended by the masses. The venue was eventually overrun by party crashers who ransacked the pantry and drank all the alcohol! After this, the furniture, carpets, and flooring suffered great damage. The crowd only went away once the alcohol was taken away from the premises.

Andrew Jacksons Inauguration Party

Andrew Jacksons Inauguration Party

James Madison

Another founding father who went on to take over the presidency, James Madison became the 4th President of the United States. He was in office from 1809 to 1817, earning the moniker “father of the constitution.” Many people remember him for his excellent leadership skills. He became Princeton University’s first graduate student after he finished college in only two years and at the top of his class. Madison led the country during the War of 1812, established the national bank, and strengthened both the government powers and the military. Meanwhile, his wife Dolly was a great First Lady who served as the role model of many women at the time. She redecorated the White House and created outreach programs.

James Madison

James Madison

William McKinley Jr.

The 25th President of the United States served from 1897 until 1901. William Mckinley Jr. was the last person to have led the country in the middle of the Civil War and helped American win the Spanish-US war. When he was in office, the U.S. experienced developments after earning the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico as territories. He was praised for improving the economy but not for pursuing justice for all citizens.

William McKinley Jr.

William McKinley Jr.

McKinley’s Assassination

President William McKinley dropped by the Temple of Music in New York on September 6, 1901. His secretary feared someone would make an attempt on his life and warned him not to push ahead with his plans. The president convinced his employee that nothing would go wrong, though he was wrong about this. The anarchist Leon Czolgosz shot him in the abdomen twice, and he died from the injury in the following week.

McKinleys Assassination

McKinleys Assassination

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, served two consecutive terms. He was in office from 1993 to 2001, and his time in office witnessed the biggest economic expansion during peace time in US history. Helen Thomas, a White House reporter, explained, “He has brought on the greatest prosperity we have ever known and he doesn’t get the credit for it and that’s too bad.” His 60% approval rating was the highest since the Second World War.

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton

Clinton’s Impeachment

Now, you cannot possibly have forgotten about his affair with Monica Lewinsky, a White House intern. When it first came out, Bill Clinton denied having any relationship with her, though he eventually confessed after evidence surfaced. We will all remember when he said, “Even presidents have private lives.”

Clintons Impeachment

Clintons Impeachment

James K. Polk

The 11th President of the United States James K. Pol was in office from 1845 to 1849. Did you know that his inauguration speech was the first one to be on the news? It was broadcasted via telegraph, of course. Polk led the nation to victory back in the US-Mexican War, and the US experienced territorial expansion under his leadership thanks to the Texas annexation and the Mexican cession.

James K. Polk

James K. Polk

James Monroe

Next, we have yet another founding father who ended up taking over the presidency. James Monroe became the 5th President of the United States and his term ran from 1817 to 1825. He was a popular presidential candidate and he won the race via a landslide. His administration later became known as the “Era of Good Feelings.” He fought in the Revolutionary War and created “The Monroe Doctrine.”

James Monroe

James Monroe

Barack Obama

Come on, you must have been living under a rock if you don’t know the 44th President of the United States! Barack Obama also made history as the first African-American to be elected to presidency. He was in office from 2009 to 2017, during which he made significant moves like introducing the Affordable Care Act. He also helped broker a nuclear deal with Iran, repeal the “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” policy in the military, and improve relations with Cuba.

Barack Obama

Barack Obama

Obama’s Inauguration

Did you know that Beyonce was asked to sing the American national anthem during his inauguration? Aside from the wonderful performance, he made this statement that earned the admiration of the viewers: “Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law.”

Obamas Inauguration

Obamas Inauguration

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson was the 28th President of the United States, and he was in office during World War I. He led the country from 1913 to 1921 and helped craft the Treaty of Versailles, which signaled the end of the Great War. Let’s not forget about this iconic quote of his: “At last the world knows America as the savior of the world!” He also made a name for himself when he wanted the country to become a member of the League of Nations, the predecessor of the United Nations, though Congress opposed this move.

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson

Lyndon Baines Johnson

Better known as LBJ, Lyndon Baines Johnson was in office from 1963 to 1969 as the 36th President of the United States. His term accomplished many things and helped move the country forward in various areas. Among other things, he passed numerous gun, welfare, and civil rights laws. He was also credited for the expansion of Medicaid and Medicare, as well as the Social Security law.

Lyndon Baines Johnson

Lyndon Baines Johnson

Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan, the 40th President of the United States, was in office from 1981 until 1989. Without a doubt, he was best known for the economic policy called Reaganomics. It focused on lower social spending, higher military spending, widespread tax cuts, and deregularized domestic markets. Aside from this, he also became known for the Iran-Contra affair and the end of the Cold War. He gave a famous speech at the Berlin Wall, which included telling Mikhail Gorbachev to “tear down this wall!”

Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan

Reagan’s Assassination Attempt

John Hinckley Jr. attempted to shoot President Ronald Reagan on March 30, 1981. Apparently, his motive took everyone by surprise. He did this in an attempt to attract the attention of actress Jodie Foster! In the iconic film Taxi Driver, her character fell in love with a presidential assassin. While a bullet hit the president in the chest, he was fortunate enough to survive the terrifying ordeal.

Reagans Assassination Attempt

Reagans Assassination Attempt

John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy was in office from 1961 to 1963 as the 35th President of the United States. Better known as JFK, his term was cut short after his assassination in 1963. He also made a name for himself as the only Roman Catholic president in US history. He was famous for his great leadership skills in the middle of the Cuban Missile Crisis and the establishment of the Peace Corps.

John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy

Kennedy’s Assassination

The whole world mourned his death on October 22, 1963. He was assassinated during a motorcade in Dallas, Texas. His assassin was none other than Lee Harvey Oswald, who shot him with a rifle while hiding in a building that overlooked the route of the motorcade. JFK died right away.

Kennedys Assassination

Kennedy’s Assassination

Thomas Jefferson

Another founding father, Thomas Jefferson was the 3rd President of the United States. He served from 1801 until 1809, making a name for himself by helping write the Declaration of Independence and increasing US territory with the Louisiana Purchase. He was also a big advocate for justice, freedom, and equality for all citizens.

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson

Harry S. Truman

The 33rd President of the United States, Harry S. Truman was in office from 1945 to 1953. He was in power right after the Second World War came to an end. This World War I veteran was the only US president who made use of nuclear weapons. A stubborn man, he apparently used his veto power 180 times! To say the least, he did this more than any other US president.

Harry S. Truman

Harry S. Truman

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight “Ike” Eisenhower was in power from 1953 to 1961. The 34th President of the United States is famous for the reversal of Truman’s policy and the desegregation of the army. He was definitely one of the best politicians in the history of United States.

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt was in power from 1901 until 1909. He received a lot of praise for his skills in administrative duties, international relations, and persuasive public speaking. He also did well in the criteria of overall vision and economic management skills. He established iconic national parks and monuments, expanded the US Navy, and launched the Panama Canal construction. Oh, and let us not forget that he ended the Russo-Japanese War and took home a Nobel Peace Prize!

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy Roosevelt’s Hobby

Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt was in power from 1901 until 1909. He received a lot of praise for his skills in administrative duties, international relations, and persuasive public speaking. He also did well in the criteria of overall vision and economic management skills. He established iconic national parks and monuments, expanded the US Navy, and launched the Panama Canal construction. Oh, and let us not forget that he ended the Russo-Japanese War and took home a Nobel Peace Prize!

Teddy Roosevelts Hobby

Teddy Roosevelts Hobby

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt, better known as FDR, was in power from 1933 to 1945. The 32nd President of the United States became so popular he was elected a total of four times! He was in service during the Great Depression and the Second World War. Among other things, he helped create the New Deal, which kickstarted various social and economic reforms.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Roosevelt’s Death

While President Franklin Roosevelt had polio, his death was the result of an intracerebral hemorrhage. Considered to be one of the best presidents the United States has ever seen, his death became a big deal all over the world. Unfortunately, he did not live to see the conclusion of World War Two.

Roosevelts Death

Roosevelts Death

George Washington

Of course, the list would not be complete without the very first President of the United States. Another founding father, George Washington held the position from 1789 to 1797 and he was a key figure in the establishment of the US government. He led the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War and has earned the 2nd spot on the list of the best US presidents.

George Washington

George Washington

Abraham Lincoln

When he was in power from 1861 to 1865, Abraham “Abe” Lincoln left behind an impressive legacy. During his time in power, he accomplished a great deal of milestones. The 16th President of the United States, he started the fight for slavery abolition and led the Union during the Civil War. In 1863, Abe passed the Emancipation Proclamation, which set into motion the framework for slavery abolition thanks to the 13th amendment. Unfortunately, his life was cut short by an assassination in 1865, and he did not live long enough to see the fruits of his hard work. Nonetheless, the survey revealed he continues to be the greatest POTUS in the eyes of the general public.

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln’s Assassination

The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln was a key event in United States history. He had been watching Our American Cousin at Ford’s Theatre on John Wilkes Booth when he was fatally shot by John Wilkes Booth. While it was not the first assassination attempt on the president, it was a successful one. It happened only 5 days after the end of the American Civil War.

Lincolns Assassination

Lincolns Assassination

Donald Trump

Donald J. Trump ran under the Republican Party during the 2016 presidential race. To say the least, he is quite a controversial person. He beat Hillary Clinton, the Democratic candidate. Apparently, the 45th President of the United States was the first one to have held the position without serving in any military or government role prior to his election.

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

Trump’s Inauguration

President Donald J. Trump was sworn into office on January 27, 2017. “From this day forward, it’s going to be only America first, America first,” he declared in his inauguration speech that ran for 17 minutes.

Trumps Inauguration

Trumps Inauguration

Presidents Of The Future

At this point in history, we are already on the 45th president of the country. Of course, we all cannot help but wonder about the next person who will take over the role. Do you think we will have our first female president soon? Only time will tell.

Presidents Of The Future

Presidents Of The Future

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