Things You Should Know About The World’s Most Dangerous Snakes

Published on 11/20/2020
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Slimy, slithery, and very dangerous. We may be talking about many things here, but in this case, we’re talking about one of the most poisonous animals in the world — snakes. Think about it. There are 3,000 species of snakes all over the world. Just about 400 of those 3,000 are incredibly venomous, and a still smaller number of those 400 are unbelievably lethal to humans. Assuming you’re not Steve Irwin, how do you know the snakes are in the group of dangerous ones? Lucky for you, we’ve put together a list like that, but don’t be surprised if you’re overwhelmed by the heebie-jeebies.

King Cobra

You’ll find King Cobra – the longest, most venomous snake in the world – in Asia and the jungles of India. Uh. GULP. It is not really a “true cobra” rising upwards of 18.8 feet. Only tell what? True, it falls into its sub-genus class instead. Will that make it less scary somehow? Okay, all right, maybe it’ll help. As they prefer to kill lizards, rats, and other snakes, King Cobras aren’t generally deadly to humans. However, in just a couple of hours, this critter has enough neurotoxin in its venom to actually paralyze and kill an elephant. Yeah, and the survival rate is about 40 percent if it bites a human.

King Cobra

King Cobra

Saw Scaled Viper

Let’s just start and claim that if you get bitten by a saw-scaled viper, health insurance coverage would not help. These vipers are usually located in India, China, and Asia, and are nocturnal and lightning fast. In addition, if you have it bit by bit, you’ll instantly notice it. In addition, as the blood pressure plummets and your pulse rate slows, the bite will swell and you will start bleeding from your mouth. That sounds like absolute torture, huh? Yeah, it is and to make matters worse, you could pass away in just a day without medication, or you could suffer from utter pain for upwards of two weeks. It’s startling how this isn’t in our health care coverage.

Saw Scaled Viper

Saw Scaled Viper

Black Mamba

Countless deaths are attributed in Africa to the Black Mamba – on top of that it is renowned for its awesome striking ability and toxicity density. In addition, we should mention that they can strike up to 12 times in succession and in addition, each single bite provides ample quantities of deadly neurotoxins. How could it get worse, possibly? Well, with only a single bite, they can also inject enough venom into their victim to kill you 25 times over. A Black Mamba bite is nearly 100 percent fatal if left untreated at all — death can occur in as little as 15 minutes.

Black Mamba

Black Mamba

Boomslang

Now the Boomslang is responsible for many deaths all around the globe, but primarily in South Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. Not only are they fast, they can also climb trees and are loaded with venomous toxins, and when they bite, they can open their jaws up to 170 degrees creepily. It’s important to remember that when the symptoms occur, you won’t feel the effects of a bite immediately, a few hours can pass. The greatest mistake you can make, however is to underestimate the life-threatening bite of boomslang. Get aid and as soon as possible, get the antivenom.

Boomslang

Boomslang

Black Tiger Snakes

Black Tiger Snakes have a deadly dose of venom and look ominous. Yay? No, particularly considering that one may die in just half an hour from a bite, while fatalities typically occur between six and 24 hours. It is astonishing that the antivenom is not covered by any health insurance – signs of a bite include numbness, sweating, and tingling. Although the majority of Tiger Snakes are afraid of humans, they can turn violent and strike if provoked.

Black Tiger Snakes

Black Tiger Snakes

Inland Taipan

The Inland Taipan comes out on top each time in terms of the deadliest venom that snakes can even possess. As if that’s a cause to rejoice, maybe if health care coverage was available, maybe. A bite can lead to blood hemorrhaging, reduced breathing, paralysis, and intense muscle damage with a mixture of taipoxin and neurotoxin. The Inland Taipan, found predominantly in inland Australia, is always shy, reclusive, and almost always flees instead of attacking. If it decides to strike, however, death will occur within just 30 to 45 minutes, unless you are almost immediately treated.

Inland Taipan

Inland Taipan

Eastern Brown Snake

Especially lethal venom is merely an understatement – just a fraction of a bite from an Eastern Brown Snake can kill any adult human. It is the world’s second-most-venomous ground snake, after all. Brown snakes, native to Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia, are particularly vicious and responsible for about 60 percent of Australia’s snake bite deaths.

Eastern Brown Snake

Eastern Brown Snake

Common Lacehead

Common lacehead, or bothrops atrox, is usually found in the tropical lowlands of northern South America. As a species of pit-viper, it’s easily agitated and is generally nocturnal. However it can hunt, as well as climb trees and swim during the day. Needless to say, their venom behaves horribly lethally and rapidly. Nearly all bites lead to temporary or even permanent memory loss, sometimes with medication. It really makes me want to re-think my choices for health insurance coverage.

Common Lacehead

Common Lacehead

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

National Geographic refers to this snake as, “The largest venomous snake in North America. Some reach 8 feet in length and weigh up to 10 pounds.” The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is not going to attack humans unless threatened – In addition, bites are caused when someone taunts or attempts to capture the snake. Oh, but before they strike, they give one final warning – it shakes its tail violently. Yeah, that tail isn’t for the show alone.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

The western diamondback rattlesnake, which is usually located in the United States’ southwestern areas, is next. Reportedly, in northern Mexico, it is responsible for the bulk of snakebite deaths and also the highest number of snakebites in the United States. Uhh, hashtag no thanks?

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Philippine Cobra

Oh goodness, we have reached the most venomous and deadliest species of Cobra out there which can spit their venom up to 10 feet away! Yeah, our jaws are on the floor here as well. With regard to the venom created by the Philippine Cobra, your nerves will shift instantly, which will then affect the cardiac and respiratory systems in just a few minutes. Can anyone explain how health insurance coverage is not a cause? Anybody?

Philippine Cobra

Philippine Cobra

Puff Adder

This snake is frightening, even though you call it what you want, Puff Adder, or Bitis Arietans. It is not only alarming, but it is also responsible for most of the deaths of any other African snake. The Puff Adder, found in the African savannah and grasslands, has a wide range and produces a powerful venom that, because of its long fangs, is produced in large quantities.

Puff Adder

Puff Adder

Indian Cobra

Yeah, we’re talking about “snake charmers” here, folks. Even though I do not know what is charming about one of the most active biting snakes in India. A bite can lead to paralysis, shortness of breath, or even a heart attack, all of which can occur within 15 minutes or up to two hours after a bite.

Indian Cobra

Indian Cobra

Russell’s Viper

Russell’s Viper is considered to be one of the deadliest snakes out there, mainly found in Southeast Asia, because of its extremely violent existence and presence in highly populated areas. In terms of its hiss, some study also suggests that this snake is THE loudest.

Russels Viper

Russel’s Viper

Common Krait

Common Krait, AKA one of the deadliest snakes alive. They have almost no neck, rising upwards of three to five feet and with a very flat head. If you come across one in the daytime, if discovered, it will hide and respond slowly. However if you run into one at night, as soon as it gets angry, it will bite. Awesome…oh wait. In addition, untreated bites contribute to nerve damage, muscle paralysis, and damage to the brain.

Common Krait

Common Krait

Terciopelo Viper

Typically found in the neotropical rainforest in Central America – the Terciopelo Viper grows up to 8 feet long and has a head 4 inches wide. Ew? Freaky? Weird? All of the above? Yeah, we’d say so! In addition, in all of Central America, these slimy animals are responsible for the majority of snakebites. If we forget, their venom contains hemotoxins that lead to death if left to be treated. So, how about an extension to your health insurance coverage?

Terciopelo Viper

Terciopelo Viper

Many-banded Krait

You may think health insurance coverage would include snakebites right now, but that seems impossible. In central and southern China and even Southeast Asia, the many-banded Krait, or Taiwanese krait or the Chinese krait, is found. However the fact that this snake is extremely dangerous is not even excused by all these names. The mortality rate is between 25-35 percent to 70-100 percent, especially when bites are left untreated. Yeah, Yikes, that doesn’t help much.

Many Banded Krait

Many Banded Krait

Malayan Snake

Southeast Asia and Indonesia is where the Malay Snake, or Blue Krait, can be found. And, believe us, under no conditions will you want to encounter this snake. Why? It contains a venom 16 times more toxic than the Cobra. **Screaming in horror** (Am I the only one screaming? Oh.)

Malayan Snake

Malayan Snake

Common Death Adder

The Common Death Adder, one of the most venomous of any snake in the world, could be found in Australia, New Guinea, and a few close islands. Bites left untreated will cause death within 24 to 48 hours. Luckily, there is an antivenom. In addition, we need to note that it’s probably the world’s fastest striking snake.

Common Death Adder, Acanthophis Antarcticus, Bruce Thomson.

Common Death Adder

Green Mambas

First of all the planet actually has three kinds of green mambas, because one is just not enough. Green mambas are all extremely venomous, highly hostile, and erratic in disposition — Western, Eastern, and Jameson. How terrific is that? Also all three species are very arboreal, lightning fast, and agile. In addition, their venom works rapidly and the dendrotoxins are even more devastating to the central nervous system, causing extreme neurotoxicity.

Green Mambas

Green Mambas

Forest Cobra

Forest Cobra, AKA black cobra AKA black AKA white-lipped cobra – how many more names could a dangerous snake possibly have?! – Sorry, rant over.~ The largest true cobra species with a length (including the tail) of up to 10 feet is currently native to Africa. Oh, this is not all right, then. When it comes to snake bites, how meaningless does health insurance coverage sound? Only think there’s something we can all do about that.

Forest Cobra

Forest Cobra

Jararaca

In all the affluent and densely populated areas of southeastern Brazil, Jararaca is the low-and-behold, best-known venomous snake. How beautiful. In fact, this critter was responsible for about 52 percent (3,446 cases) of snakebites between 1902 and 1945, with a total mortality rate of 0.7 percent (25 deaths). Need we mention the deadly venom of them?

Jararaca

Jararaca

South American Bushmaster

Let me introduce the longest venomous snake in the Western Hemisphere, or rather the longest pit viper on Earth, the South American bushmaster. Native to South America, the equatorial forests east of the Andes in particular. Furthermore, they’re tall, hard, and violent, everything you might want in a snake….

South American Bushmaster

South American Bushmaster

Cape Cobra

As far as Africa is concerned, one of the deadliest in life is Cape Cobra. One has a lethal venom and it prefers to live around/in homes because of two facts. Ok, uhh, no thanks. More often than not, after a bite, death will occur within an hour to ten hours.

Cape Cobra

Cape Cobra

Sharp-nosed Pit Viper

According to the U.S. Armed Forces Pest Management Board, the venom a Sharp-nosed Pit Viper has is a potent hemotoxin which is strongly hemorrhagic. Let’s just say that the effects of a bite are extremely painful and lethal. While the rate of envenomation is about 80%, the rate of untreated mortality is near 1-10%.

Sharp Nosed Pit Viper

Sharp Nosed Pit Viper

Black-Necked Spitting Cobra

With a name like Black-Necked Spitting Cobra, yeah, you’re gonna make the list. Mainly found in Sub-Saharan Africa, this critter has a potent venom, one that causes severe harm to the skin. They are moderately sized snakes that can grow to a length of 1.2 to 2.2 m in length. Their coloration and markings can vary considerably. They prey primarily on small rodents.

Black Necked Spitting Cobra

Black Necked Spitting Cobra

Gaboon Viper

Gaboon vipers prefer to live in sub-Saharan Africa’s rainforests and savannas. It is extremely venomous, much like the rest of the Viper family. In addition, it is the largest member of the genus group AND it is the heaviest viperid in the world – even with the longest fangs (2 inches long). Wait, more than that it has the highest venom yield of any snake, too. So I’m not a fan.

Gaboon Viper

Gaboon Viper

Dugite

A highly venomous Australian brown snake species is Dugite, or Pseudonaja affinis. One that isn’t covered by health insurance either. Their venom contains neurotoxins that are presynaptic and postsynaptic, plus procoagulants. Both of which are disagreeable, folks.

Dugite

Dugite

King Brown Snake or Mulga Snake

A genus of highly venomous snake of the family Elapidae, native to northern, western, and central Australia, is the King Brown Snake. It is a member of the genus Pseudechis despite its common name, and only distantly related to true brown snakes. Australian King brown snake, or Mulga snake, is actually THE second longest species of venomous snake in Australia! When they bite, they tend to release large amounts of venom, so no thanks.

King Brown Snake Or Mulga Snake

King Brown Snake Or Mulga Snake

Belcher’s Sea Snake

Although it has a thin body and a short reach, the Sea Snake of Belcher is actually one of the planet’s deadliest animals. The Sea Snake of Belcher also has a potent insane venom, where only a milligram of the venom of the snake could potentially kill thousands of adult human beings.

Belchers Sea Snake

Belchers Sea Snake

Anaconda

Currently, Anaconda’s are unrealistically huge snakes that can even swallow a whole person. Due to its sheer size, Anaconda’s are still very hazardous despite their lack of venom. Currently, this snake tends to wrap victims around the midsection and then tries to squeeze them until they are completely compressed or totally suffocated. It starts to swallow you whole from that point on. GULP.

Anaconda

Anaconda

Desert Horned Viper

Cerastes cerastes is a venomous species of viper native to the deserts of northern Africa and parts of the Arabian Peninsula and the Levant, commonly known as the Saharan horned viper or the horned desert viper. Desert Horned Viper move sideways, which is totally creepy! Usually found in Middle East and northern parts of Africa. Oh and they’re also incredibly toxic…so you know, stay far, far away.

Desert Horned Viper

Desert Horned Viper

Red-Bellied Black Snake

Red-bellied black snakes are native to Australia and are a poisonous species. It also consists of myotoxins, coagulants and also has haemolytic and cytotoxic properties with respect to the venom. Bites are not life-threatening, but you do need medical treatment, something that is sadly not covered by your health insurance.

Red Bellied Black Snake

Red Bellied Black Snake

Tiger Keelback

The Tiger Keelback can be identified with its dorsal color pattern is olive-drab green with black and bright orange crossbars or spots from the neck down the first third of the body. The belly is whitish. The average length is usually 60–100 cm (24-39 inches) East and Southeast Asia is where you’ll find the Tiger Keelback. Oh, and it’s not on your health insurance coverage if you should get bit. Usually grows to a length of 24-39 inches too!

Tiger Keelback

Tiger Keelback

Burrowing Asp

Burrowing Asp is a very scary name! It’s even more frightening, particularly when you hear that it likes to hide underground, usually near children’s playgrounds. Time to phone, like now for health insurance coverage. Not only because of where it hides, but because its poison is injected more deeply than any other living snake.

Burrowing Asp

Burrowing Asp

Coastal Taipan

Oh great, the Coastal Taipan species is up next. See that’s sarcasm, cause this snake is one large, highly venomous snake which belongs to the Elapidae family. Local to northern and eastern Australia’s coastal regions as well as the island of New Guinea. Nevertheless, according to toxicological research, this species of snake ranks as the world’s sixth-most venomous land snake. Yeah, no thanks, that’s scary.

Web

Coastal Taipan

Western Brown Snake

Meet the Pseudonaja nuchalis, more commonly known as the Western Brown Snake, which is a highly venomous brown snake species commonly found in Western Australia. Plus, it has a potent venom packed with neurotoxins, procoagulants, and nephrotoxins. Symptoms such as headache, nausea/vomiting, stomach pain, extreme coagulopathy, and even kidney damage are produced by bites. Many of which are commonly protected by health insurance.

Western Brown Snake

Western Brown Snake

Rhinoceros Viper

Bitis nasicornis is a genus of venomous viper found in the West and Central African forests. A large viper noted for its striking coloration and prominent nasal “horns.” There are currently no subspecies known. Rhinoceros viper, or Bitis nasicornis, is a large species of viper. While they’re slow moving, they are able to strike quickly. Oh, and their hiss sounds like a shriek – that’s reason enough for me to never be a snake lover.

Rhinoceros Viper

Rhinoceros Viper

Caspian Cobra

A genus of venomous snake in the family Elapidae is the Caspian cobra, also called the Central Asian cobra, ladle snake, Oxus cobra, or Russian cobra. Putting health insurance coverage out of your mind, the Caspian cobra, AKA the Central Asian cobra, Oxus cobra, or Russian cobra, is located in Central Asia. Aggressive? Bad-tempered? Most venomous species of the cobra? Triple check.

Caspian Cobra

Caspian Cobra

Alcatrazes Lancehead

No this has nothing to do with prison, but this snake will certainly be the end of the life of any man. The Alcatrazes Lanceheads, native to the coastal islands surrounding Brazil, are considered to be critically endangered, meaning that they are almost extinct. Whether or not this is a positive idea is for you to say.

Alcatrazes Lancehead1

Alcatrazes Lancehead

Beaked Sea Snake

The Beaked Snake of the Sea, or the Common Snake of the Sea, or the Hook-nosed Snake of the Sea, or the Valakadyn Snake of the Sea have several names (apparently), but you can only call it Val. This slitherer not only finds his prey in the water, he also accounts for the vast majority of lethal snake bites that occur in water. watch out!

Beaked Sea Snake1

Beaked Sea Snake

Black Desert Cobra

The Beaked Snake of the Sea, or the Common Snake of the Sea, or the Hook-nosed Snake of the Sea, or the Valakadyn Snake of the Sea have several names (apparently), but you can only call it Val. This slitherer not only finds his prey in the water, he also accounts for the vast majority of lethal snake bites that occur in water. watch out!

Black Desert Cobra

Black Desert Cobra

Black Banded Sea Krait

The Black Banded Sea Krait, like the rest of us, loves warm waters. Swimming in the western Pacific Ocean might give you an opportunity to encounter this snake. While one of the most venomous sea snakes is this fella, it normally doesn’t bite humans, whew!

Black Banded Sea Krait1

Black Banded Sea Krait

Cascabel

When you hear this South American serpent shaking his maracas (shakers, if you will), my advice is, RUN! This member of the larger rattlesnake family, chose to live in the area of Argentina. Typically, the Cascabel lives between 10 and 25 years, but it can trigger a bite that can take a person that many years!

Cascabel1

Cascabel

Darevsky’s Viper

This eerie creature’s zig-zag form is not the only dizzying feature of this snake. A punch (or maybe a bite) that sends the poison into their prey is filled with their foldable fangs. Their venom is concealed behind their eyes in glands! It is not shocking that their eyesight is not too good.

Darevskys Vipers1

Darevsky’s Vipers

Dubois’ Sea Snake

Growing up, my mother always told us not to delve too deep into the ocean. All the scary monster-like creatures swim all the way out there… or do they? Dubois’ Sea Snake just happens to be really like shallow waters. Uh oh! Uh oh! They love to come out at dusk and dawn, so should you find yourself in Papa New Guinea, schedule your swimming accordingly.

Dubois Sea Snake1

Dubois’ Sea Snake

Horned Viper

Take a look at his face and you’ll find two sharp growing horns coming from his eyes, if you want to know how he got his name. Now, now before you begin to wish that this bad-boy didn’t exist, you need to realize that he’s ecologically significant. A large number of rodent issues are taken care of by this raised-eyebrow viper, meaning fewer mice and rats.

Horned Viper1

Horned Viper

Indochinese Spitting Cobra

A snake. A spitting snake. A venom-spitting snake. It’s not getting any scarier than that, thankfully. It is not one of the tamer cobras, but it is one of the thinner cobras out there. This cobra can bite its adversary and chew aggressively until death, literally, if spitting venom isn’t enough.

Indochinese Spitting Cobra1

Indochinese Spitting Cobra

Malayan Pit Viper

One of the most audacious snakes in the world is the Malayan Pit Viper. It inhabits the southeast Asian regions and is considered to be very aggressive. It estimates that there are more than 700 human attacks a year, many of which kill people. What’s really odd is that the Malayan Pit Viper normally doesn’t leave the area for hours, even after it strikes.

Malayan Pit Viper1

Malayan Pit Viper

Mojave Rattlesnake

Mexico hosts one of the world’s most venomous snakes. It is not threatened by any way the World Wildlife Foundation announced. In particular, the Mojave Rattlesnake is very aggressive towards humans, and when it bites, if it doesn’t get medical attention, it can kill anyone in less than an hour.

Mojave Rattlesnake1

Mojave Rattlesnake

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