James Bond Ranked The Most And Least Profitable 007 Movie Ever Produced

Published on 12/04/2020
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We’d be just over a month away from the domestic release of No Time to Die if things had gone to plan, and we’d have a pretty good idea of how the film would measure both the recent franchise installments and the competition. This list will not be in the order of quality, but I wanted to take a moment to rate the return rating for the 25 films. It’s no wonder that earlier movies are at the top of the list, and later movies, which cost more exponentially, are at the bottom, but those who are so inclined were surprised. And now, without wasting time…

James Bond Ranked The Most And Least Profitable 007 Movie Ever Produced

James Bond Ranked The Most And Least Profitable 007 Movie Ever Produced

Dr. No (1962)

Budget: $1 million
Worldwide Box Office: $59.6 million
Rate of Return: 59.6

With this comparatively small-scale and low-tech actioner, James Bond started at an all-time high. This first 007 adventure, which pitted Sean Connery against the title baddie, in a skewed irony, is both the lowest-grossing and most profitable entry in the entire franchise in terms of gross versus budget.

Dr. No And Honey Ryder

Agent 007 is heading to Jamaica to prosecute the British intelligence chief’s assassination. There, he saw the first Bond girl, Honey Ryder, played by Ursula Andress. Bond also discovers Spectre’s presence, an evil organization (or Special Executive for Counter-Intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge, and Extortion).

Dr. No And Honey Ryder

Dr. No And Honey Ryder

From Russia With Love (1963)

Budget: $2 million
Worldwide Box Office: $78.9 million
Rate of Return: 39.45

John F. Kennedy famously listed From Russia With Love as one of his favorite novels, and just days before he was assassinated in Dallas, he saw this movie adaptation. This second James Bond movie and the one closest to the Hitchcock thrillers of that era are still the very best (including an obvious ode to North By Northwest). From Russia With Love would still be a trendsetting (and terrific) action thriller even if the franchise had flamed out early.

24. From Russia With Love (1963)

From Russia With Love (1963)

From Russia With Love

From Russia with Love is a razor-sharp, briskly-paced Cold War suspense containing many electrifying action scenes. This time combating a secret group known as SPECTRE. Russians Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya) and Kronsteen will use the ravishing Tatiana (Daniela Bianchi) to trick Bond into supporting them. Bond happily journeys to meet Tatiana in Istanbul, where he must rely on his humor to survive his life in a sequence of enemy encounters.

From Russia With Love

From Russia With Love

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)

Budget: $8 million
Worldwide Box Office: $82 million
Rate of Return: 10.25

Underrated in its day and now almost overrated today, this single installment was a change of pace but a moderate disappointment. While Sean Connery’s “blunt instrument” version in love may have been an interesting hook, telling such a story with a new actor, even one who looked at the part and was a superior onscreen fighter, was both less of a gimmick and a bridge too far. Diamonds Are Forever would have been better with Lazenby if Her Majesty’s Secret Service had been better with Sean Connery.

23. On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

To battle against the dark SPECTRE organization in the treacherous Swiss Alps, Agent 007 (George Lazenby) and the adventurous Tracy Di Vicenzo (Diana Rigg) joined forces installment. Yet Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Telly Savalas), the group’s influential boss, is unveiling his most calamitous plan yet: a germ warfare conspiracy that could destroy millions!

On Her Majesty's Secret Service

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

The Man With The Golden Gun (1974)

Budget: $7 million
Worldwide Box Office: $97.6 million
Rate of Return: 13.9

This “Roger Moore versus Christopher Lee” thriller suffered either because the movie was not that great or because audiences did not care much about Live and Let Die. One of the few 007 movies to open poorly and is usually considered one of the smaller installments. Although it is considered one of the least successful installments, I’m sure that any modern release would love to earn 13.9x its production budget.

22. The Man With the Golden Gun (1974)

The Man With the Golden Gun (1974)

The Man With The Golden Gun

James Bond was destined for destruction, and to live, he’ll need both his deadly instincts and seductive appeal. Roger Moore returns as 007, facing off in a lethal cat-and-mouse game with world-renowned killer Francisco Scaramanga (Christopher Lee), whose preferred weapon is a distinctive gold gun. If Scaramanga seizes the priceless Solex energy converter, 007 must do its best to retrieve it.

The Man With The Golden Gun

The Man With The Golden Gun

(tie) Thunderball (1965)

Budget: $9 million
Worldwide Box Office: $111.6 million
Rate of Return: 15.69

The fourth installment doubled down on spectacle and bigger-than-life action, including an Oscar-winning underwater climax, budgeted at three times what Goldfinger cost and shot in 2.35:1. This is still the largest-grossing 007 movie in North America in adjusted domestic earnings, grossing $65 million. Thunderball would be the largest “real world action movie” ever, give or take the Black Panther, which ironically is partly an example of Marvel “approx.” a 007-flick. This would cost around $701 million.

20. (tie) Thunderball (1965)

(tie) Thunderball (1965)

Thunderball

As James Bond falls into his fourth journey packed with intense confrontations and incredible underwater action scenes, the thrills never give up. Connery introduces his signature style and magnetism to 007 when he goes beyond the call of duty – and to the depths of the ocean – as he flies to Nassau to hunt down the villainous terrorist Emilio Largo (Adolfo Celi), who wants to plunge the planet into a nuclear holocaust.

Thunderball

Thunderball

(tie) You Only Live Twice (1967)

Budget: $9.5 million
Worldwide Box Office: $111.6 million
Rate of Return: 11.74

Sean Connery was essentially on autopilot here, and both offensive (for obvious reasons) and a waste of time is the entire “James Bond becomes Japanese” subplot. This large-budget offering, the first directed by Lewis Gilbert, would set the template for several future 007 entries and a whole genre of spoofs from James Bond. Blofeld (played by Donald Pleasence) was introduced, and its volcano layer and the climactic finale of “bad guys versus ninjas” are still pretty spectacular.

20. (tie) You Only Live Twice (1967)

(tie) You Only Live Twice (1967)

You Only Live Twice

A space tragedy drives humanity into World War III, and only James Bond (Sean Connery) can stop it. As U.S. and Soviet satellites are hijacked in Earth’s orbit, 007 should fight to stop a nuclear war between the two superpowers. His risky quest brings him to Japan, where he must avoid the SPECTRE organization and its diabolical boss, Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Donald Pleasence), concealed in a vast volcano headquarters.

You Only Live Twice

You Only Live Twice

Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

Budget: $7.2 million
Worldwide Box Office: $116 million
Rate of Return: 16.1

After sitting down at Her Majesty’s Secret Service, this return trip for Sean Connery came with a then-record $1.5 million paycheck (which the actor mostly donated to charity). This is not one of the best 007 movies, following an emotional and dramatic predecessor in pure camp with a romp. Nevertheless, fans were thrilled to see Connery one last time back in the saddle.

19. Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

Diamonds Are Forever

A wealth in stolen diamonds drives James Bond back into motion and takes him through Amsterdam, Los Angeles, and finally, glamourous Las Vegas on an anxious pursuit. When researching the world’s diamond market’s mysterious operations, Agent 007 (Sean Connery) learns that his wicked nemesis Blofeld (Charles Gray) stores the diamonds to use in his lethal laser satellite… and the world’s survival hangs in the balance.

Diamonds Are Forever

Diamonds Are Forever

Goldfinger (1964)

Budget: $3 million
Worldwide Box Office: $124.9 million
Rate of Return: 41.6

The third installment is the one that transformed 007 into a phenomenon of global pop culture. This trendsetting adventure is also an example of how, at least in its initial run, the James Bond series made a point to differentiate each entry so that no new 007 movies felt alike, trading the comparatively Hitchcockian thrills of its processors for something approaching outright fantasy.

18. Goldfinger (1964)

Goldfinger (1964)

Goldfinger

James Bond’s third screen adventure is a thrilling, pulse-pounding thrill-ride from the opening bomb explosion outside a nightclub to a last-minute escape from the President’s personal jet. Sean Connery assumes command as 007 and squares off with a manic villain intent on stealing all of Fort Knox’s gold—and destroying the global economy.

Goldfinger

Goldfinger

A View To A Kill (1985)

Budget: $30 million
Worldwide Box Office: $152.6 million
Rate of Return: 5.08

Roger Moore’s final entry, yet another example of the series ripping off itself, offered a past-his-prime Bond facing off against a genetically engineered mad man who wants to flood Silicon Valley to get a computer chip monopoly. Part Goldfinger, part Superman, all mediocrity. Well, not really the worst of the series, but it’s really just sitting there running in place, waiting to get this franchise back into gear by a new actor. Speaking of which…

17. A View to a Kill (1985)

A View To A Kill (1985)

A View To A Kill

Roger Moore’s final role as James Bond in this white-knuckle spy thriller contributes fun, beauty, and deadly charm. Bond challenges Max Zorin (Christopher Walken), a power-mad industrialist who has planned to corner the world’s microchip sector, even though he has to sacrifice millions to do so. But before Bond can save the fool, he must face Zorin’s stunning, deadly companion, May Day (Grace Jones).

A View To A Kill

A View To A Kill

License To Kill (1989)

Budget: $42 million
Worldwide Box Office: $156 million
Rate of Return: 3.71

If the James Bond series shows Octopussy and The Living Daylights trying to show off alongside the initial Indiana Jones trilogy, License to Kill, Timothy Dalton’s second and final installment is “Bond does Miami. Vice and competes with Lethal Weapon and Die Hard.” While not quite a flop, it only earned $34 million domestically and showed the longtime king of the mountain action movie struggling against Batman, Lethal Weapon 2, Indiana Jones, and the Last Crusade.

16. License to Kill (1989)

License To Kill (1989)

License To Kill

The suspect winds up fleeing and critically harming Leiter and murdering his wife after Bond supports his old buddy Felix Leiter in arresting a drug dealer called Franz Sanchez. As Bond is told to return to his daily duties by M, the leader of MI6, he declines, prompting M to withhold his license to destroy. That implies that Bond must embark as a fugitive agent on his quest for revenge.

License To Kill

License To Kill

Never Say Never Again (1983)

Budget: $36 million
Worldwide Box Office: $160 million
Rate of Return: 4.44

This unofficial James Bond movie is a loose remake of Thunderball. It only exists because the Thunderball novel’s rights ended up with Kevin McClory and could make a rival 007 movie from the plot and characters of Thunderball. And, yes, Sean Connery is back, but not better than ever. This is not an all-time high for anyone involved, and audiences ended up selecting the genuine article (Octopussy) over this glorified imitation offering.

15. Never Say Never Again (1983)

Never Say Never Again (1983)

Never Say Never Again

Sean Connery returns as James Bond – 12 years since the part was last performed by him. Again, this isn’t an official movie concerning Eon/MGM. It was created by Taliafilm instead and distributed by Warner Bros. The movie title is a nod to Connery, who once claimed he would never play James Bond again. And it’s a reboot of Thunderball, really. (The film rights to the book were obtained by one of Ian Flemings’ writing colleagues, so that’s where this series comes from.)

Never Say Never Again

Never Say Never Again

Live and Let Die (1973)

Budget: $7 million
Worldwide Box Office: $161.8 million
Rate of Return: 23.1

In a loose riff on the era’s blaxploitation movies, Roger Moore’s first rodeo as James Bond sends him into the drug dens of New Orleans. Yaphet Katto is a fun baddie, but for much of the movie, the (understandable) desire not to portray the many black villains as fools makes Bond himself stumble in the dark. Even so, Live and Let Die began the Roger Moore era with a bang, contrary to popular belief.

14. Live and Let Die (1973)

Live and Let Die (1973)

Live and Let Die

With beauty, humor, and deadly assurance, Roger Moore, in his first performance as the classic MI6 agent, steps in as the suave, elegant and lethal 007. In an expedition that tumbles him from the streets of New York City to the bayou nation of Louisiana, Bond fights the powers of black magic as he faces off against a voodoo-worshipping opium czar (Yaphet Kotto), who is eager to kill Bond and take over the planet.

Live and Let Die

Live and Let Die

The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

Budget: $14 million
Worldwide Box Office: $185.4 million
Rate of Return: 13.2

This third Roger Moore flick is considered a comeback installment. This second installment directed by Lewis Gilbert was the first 007 film since Thunderball to top $45 million domestic, and its budget-busting spectacle, crowd-pleasing henchman (Jaws), and “Bond Girl” of the moment made this a definitive entry in the franchise. The first instance of the franchise arguably repeating itself by being a loose remake of You Only Live Twice.

13. The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

The Spy Who Loved Me

No one would do that better than Bond, and in The Spy Who Loved Me, which brings him from the Egyptian pyramids to a gravity-defying mountain top ski pursuit, he shows it once again. As he and the glamorous Soviet investigator Anya Amasova (Barbara Bach) team up to examine lost Allied and Russian atomic submarines, Roger Moore introduces an inimitable style to 007, tracking a dangerous trail leading to billionaire shipping magnate Karl Stromberg (Curt Jurgens).

The Spy Who Loved Me

The Spy Who Loved Me

Octopussy (1983)

Budget: $27.5 million
Worldwide Box Office: $187.5 million
Rate of Return: 6.818

This entry is noteworthy for opening almost simultaneously with the Never Say Never Again produced by Kevin McClory, an “unofficial” James Bond movie that A) came about because McClory had Thunderball rights and B) featured Sean Connery back in the role that made him an icon. Another real-world action thriller is this underrated (or at least under-discussed) entry, and Never Say Never Again was comparatively whopped. Yes, this is where Moore is dressed as a clown, but don’t hold it against the series.

12. Octopussy (1983)

Octopussy (1983)

Octopussy

In an electrifying adventure, James Bond (Roger Moore) is back as 007 explores the death of a fellow agent caught clutching an invaluable Fabergé egg. The trail leads to the enigmatic Octopussy (Maud Adams), a company of luscious, athletic people whose traveling circus features. Bond and Octopussy share a passionate love, but then 007 figures out that the beautiful Kamal Khan (Louis Jourdan) is working to hurl civilization into World War III with an insane Russian officer.

Octopussy

Octopussy

The Living Daylights (1987)

Budget: $40 million
Worldwide Box Office: $191.2 million
Rate of Return: 4.78

Timothy Dalton’s first 007, a loose riff on the Iran/Contra scandal, is the most complicated spy story of the series. The first 2/3 of this film is as grounded and espionage-y as the series gets, while the final third features our hero fighting alongside the Mujahideen in what is both an oddly-dated plot turn and a surprisingly positive portrayal of Islamic freedom fighters. It also shows 80’s Bond struggling to be real-world spy thrillers and the need to compete with Indiana Jones-like the Octopussy series.

11. The Living Daylights (1987)

The Living Daylights (1987)

The Living Daylights

In his debut film as Super Agent James Bond, Timothy Dalton is suave, cunning, and deadly. Agent 007, armed with razor-sharp intuition, a gadget-laden Aston Martin and his license to destroy, must battle diabolical gun traffickers who are united in a horrific plot world dominance that could be connected with the high command of the Soviet military.

The Living Daylights

The Living Daylights

For Your Eyes Only (1981)

Budget: $28 million
Worldwide Box Office: $195.3 million
Rate of Return: 6.975

With this deliberately buttoned-down and real-world entry, Roger Moore’s 007 entered the 1980’s, eschewing the underwater fortress and deep-space adventures for this old-school Cold War thriller. This “no muss, no fuss” entry, featuring some of the better vehicle chases of the Moore era, earned about as much on a slightly smaller budget, whether or not audiences embraced Moonraker due to its outer-space climax.

10. For Your Eyes Only (1981)

For Your Eyes Only (1981)

For Your Eyes Only

As Bond tries to destroy the Greek underworld to obtain a device capable of commanding a group of nuclear submarines, Roger Moore plays Agent 007 with deadly resolve. From the bottom of the sea to the top of mountains, in this taut, fast-paced adventure, the 12th in the popular Bond series, Bond will struggle to the end to hold the gadget out of the hands of the Russians.

For Your Eyes Only

For Your Eyes Only

Moonraker (1979)

Budget: $31 million
Worldwide Box Office: $210 million
Rate of Return: 6.78

Yes, Moonraker is the one where A) Jaws comes back and falls in love and B) lasers are shot in James Bond’s outer space. Whether the audience was thrilled with the “James Bond does Star Wars” pitch or reacted to the surprisingly good/much-liked Spy Who Loved Me two years earlier, until GoldenEye, this was the biggest-grossing 007 film. Most of the film is lean, mean, and briskly-paced, despite being yet another loose remake of You Only Live Twice. The outer-space climax feels less Star Wars and more “Thunderball in space.”

9. Moonraker (1979)

Moonraker (1979)

Moonraker

In this journey that brings 007 from Venice to Rio de Janeiro and on to outer space, Roger Moore returns for his fourth tenure as James Bond and blasts into orbit. He and the stunning NASA scientist Holly Goodhead (Lois Chiles) are suddenly trapped in a life-or-death fight against Hugo Drax (Michael Lonsdale), a power-mad industrialist whose horrible plan could kill all human life on Earth, as Bond investigates the hijacking of the American space shuttle.

Moonraker

Moonraker

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

Budget: $110 million
Worldwide Box Office: $340 million
Rate of Return: 3.08

With Michelle Yeoh playing a Chinese super-spy ass-kicking who teams up with Pierce Brosnan’s 007 to save the world from a war-hungry media mogul, Roger Spottiswoode provided this delightful remake of The Spy Who Loved Me. This installment was the first under two hours since You Only Live Twice. It also opened in North America ($125 million) simultaneously with Titanic and still out-grossed GoldenEye. Befitting its Christmas release since Never Say Never Again and Octopussy in 1983, its $25 million weekends 5x multiplier made it the leggiest 007 films.

8. Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

Tomorrow Never Dies

In this incredible journey, Pierce Brosnan comes back as 007. To gain high ratings for his media empire, a deranged media tycoon (Jonathan Pryce) is attempting to destabilize the global economy by orchestrating a deadly standoff amongst world superpowers. Today, in a struggle to stop his reign of chaos and avert World War III, Bond has to take on this wicked mastermind.

Tomorrow Never Dies

Tomorrow Never Dies

GoldenEye (1995)

Budget: $60 million
Worldwide Box Office: $356 million
Rate of Return: 5.905

After six years of post-License to Kill hand wringing and various studio-related legal and business conflicts, Martin Campbell brought the franchise roaring back to life. Pierce Brosnan makes his debut in this smashing adventure thriller, my personal pick for the best 007 movies ever. This was the first 007 film to top $100 million nationally and, obviously, the first to top $211 million, let alone $350 million worldwide. And since it had a comparatively B-level budget, it remains the last 007 movies to get close to 6x its budget anywhere.

7. GoldenEye (1995)

GoldenEye (1995)

GoldenEye

This film, which has the most eye-popping opening sequence yet, the effortlessly gentle and elegant Pierce Brosnan makes his debut as Agent 007. The bond must accompany his former ally to Cuba, Monte Carlo, Switzerland, and Russia as Agent 006 (Sean Bean) goes rogue and plots world dominance with a frightening satellite-borne missile while fleeing a beautiful, lethal femme fatale (Famke Janssen) who would stop at nothing to put the squeeze on the brave spy.

GoldenEye

GoldenEye

The World Is Not Enough (1999)

Budget: $135 million
Worldwide Box Office: $362 million
Rate of Return: 2.67

Sure, Denise Richards isn’t anyone’s favorite “Bond Girl,” and she’s only there because Sophie Marceau turns out to be the villain. However, her predecessors still out-earned this Michael Apted-directed actioner. It was such a nice plot that Chris Nolan borrowed it for The Dark Knight Rises, while it was borrowed for Skyfall by Sam Mendes. Alas, it is, by default, the least “profitable” installment in the franchise because of a high budget and a global gross essentially tied to GoldenEye.

6. The World Is Not Enough (1999)

The World Is Not Enough (1999)

The World Is Not Enough

He is propelled into a thrilling adventure when Agent 007 (Pierce Brosnan) is tasked to defend a glamorous oil heiress (Sophie Marceau), which pits him against one of his most devastating enemies: Renard (Robert Carlyle), a brutal anarchist whose complete impermissibility to pain renders him a nearly invincible adversary. In this explosively exciting thriller, the unrelenting excitement, spectacular action, and clever wit never let up.

The World Is Not Enough

The World Is Not Enough

Die Another Day (2002)

Budget: $142 million
Worldwide Box Office: $432 million
Rate of Return: 3

While history claims to be one of the worst franchise films, I agree with the initial reviews and pre-release buzz for this fourth and final Pierce Brosnan flick. Before hitting a ride in the second half to fantasyland, this one starts as a grounded spy thriller, and the switch is even more jarring. Still, James Bond ruled a $47 million franchise opening and $160 million domestic cume despite competition from The Sum of All Fears, The Bourne Identity, and xXx that year. Like Spider-Man, this franchise was all-time highly rebooted.

5. Die Another Day (2002)

Die Another Day (2002)

Die Another Day

James Bond (Pierce Brosnan) takes out all the stops in this adrenaline-pumping journey around the nation. Bond finds himself being kidnapped by the enemy and betrayed by MI6 after his mission is sabotaged. Bond, ready to take vengeance, goes head-to-head with a sultry assassin (Halle Berry), a frosty investigator (Rosamund Pike), and a mysterious billionaire (Toby Stephens) whose company is gems… but whose secret is a diabolical tool that might get the planet down to its knees.

Die Another Day

Die Another Day

Quantum Of Solace (2015)

Budget: $200 million
Worldwide Box Office: $589 million
Rate of Return: 2.985

This short, violent, and relatively atypical 007 film was almost as successful as Casino Royale, despite mixed reviews and complicated reception. Chalk it to the franchise’s last goodwill or popularity, but this ruthless revenge thriller, a kind of “Bond cosplays Jason Statham and Jason Bourne,” still brought in crowds. This offering, one of the more explicitly political installments, presented the U.S. Government as indifferent to the plot of the supervillain. This film allowed Olga Kurylenko to avenge her murdered father without any moral lectures or finger-wagging, unlike many women seeking vengeance films.

4. Quantum of Solace (2015)

Quantum of Solace (2015)

Quantum Of Solace

Bond (Daniel Craig) encounters the stunning yet feisty Camille (Olga Kurylenko), who takes him to Dominic Greene (Mathieu Amalric), a cynical businessman and main force inside the enigmatic Quantum group, on a non-stop search for justice that crisscrosses the planet. As Bond uncovers a plot to gain possession of one of the most valuable natural resources in the country, he must negotiate a minefield of treachery, deceit, and assassination to neutralize Quantum before it is too late.

Quantum Of Solace

Quantum Of Solace

Casino Royale (2006)

Budget: $150 million
Worldwide Box Office: $616 million
Rate of Return: 4.1

For the second time, Martin Campbell “saves” James Bond again, introducing Daniel Craig in what amounts to a reboot of “Bond’s first mission.” the first formal adaptation of Ian Fleming’s very first novel. Casino Royale is one of the series’ best movies, offering a character-driven melodrama, brutal but properly Bond-ish action set pieces, and a grim post-9/11 mentality that still feels like a movie through 007.

3. Casino Royale (2006)

Casino Royale (2006)

Casino Royale

Casino Royale represents the first appearance of Daniel Craig at the beginning of his career as the iconic James Bond, having only won 00 status and his license to kill. His aim: the implacable terrorist financier known as Le Chiffre (Mads Mikkelsen). The search of Le Chiffre by Bond leads to a confrontation in a high-stakes poker game at the lavish Casino Royale in Montenegro and a jaw-dropping finale on the Grand Canal in Venice, from the jungles of Madagascar to the beaches of the Bahamas.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

Spectre (2015)

Budget: $240 million
Worldwide Box Office: $881 million
Rate of Return: 3.67

After his blow-out success with Skyfall, Sam Mendes came back to direct, but the results were less than ideal this time out. The film’s awkward attempts to meld Roger Moore-era kitsch and MCU-style mythology with the real-world espionage adventures of Daniel Craig did not work. Nevertheless, Bond is Bond, and on both counts, Skyfall’s follow-up still earned $200 million domestic and $881 million worldwide, second only to Skyfall. It may have been one of the worst 007 movies, but it was still a monster hit by any rational definition.

2. Spectre (2015)

Spectre (2015)

Specter

James Bond (Daniel Craig) sends a mysterious note from the past, on a rogue quest to penetrate a shadowy group identified as SPECTRE. Meanwhile, back in London, Max Denbigh (Andrew Scott), the current director of the Centre for National Security, doubts Bond’s behavior and disputes the relevance of MI6, guided by M (Ralph Fiennes). He discovers a chilling link between himself and the adversary (Christoph Waltz) he finds as Bond travels into the core of SPECTRE.

Spectre

Spectre

Skyfall (2012)

Budget: $200 million
Worldwide Box Office: $1.11 billion
Rate of Return: 5.55

This Sam Mendes-directed entry is a hodgepodge of the four Pierce Brosnan films, notably GoldenEye and The World Is Not Enough, and yes, throughout the four Pierce Brosnan films, both M and James Bond were grade-A screw-ups that failed in almost every task given them. But the audience was thrilled by this paced trip-wire and the magnificent thriller “Bond does Chris Nolan.” Skyfall is the only $1-billion 007 movies so far, opening on Dr. No’s 50th anniversary and riding a wave of rave reviews, terrific buzz, and lack of blockbuster competition.

1. Skyfall (2012)

Skyfall (2012)

Skyfall

As the new task by Bond (Daniel Craig) goes bad, agents worldwide are revealed, and MI6 is targeted. These events trigger M (Judi Dench) ‘s influence to be questioned by Mallory (Ralph Fiennes), the Committee on Intelligence and Defense. M is left with only one ally whom she can fully trust, with MI6 already compromised: Bond. Following a route to the elusive Silva (Javier Bardem), whose dangerous and secret intentions have not yet been identified, 007 takes to the dark.

Skyfall

Skyfall

No Time To Die (2020)

Budget: $250 million
Worldwide Box Office: NA
Rate of Return: NA

I obviously have no idea what the story will turn out to be behind this 25th “official” James Bond movie or how much this fifth and final Daniel Craig movie will earn in worldwide box office returns. But to avoid becoming the least profitable, it must earn at least $668 million worldwide in budget vs. gross. That seems plausible enough, but that would still be the third-largest earner of the franchise behind Skyfall and Spectre, without inflation, so hopefully, it works as intended, giving Craig what Connery, Moore, and Brosnan never got a decent swan song.

No Time To Die (2020)

No Time To Die (2020)

No Time To Die

A retiring 007 will be pushed back into action by the new Bond entry to combat a villain plan, identified as Satin, risking millions of lives. Daniel Craig is playing Bond again, except this time he’s going to have support from a lady called Nomi, who took his role as 007, as well as his old buddies Miss Moneypenny, Q, and M. The return of Christoph Waltz’s Blofeld is also teased by trailers for the movie.

No Time To Die

No Time To Die

Fun facts about the Bond series no one tell you about

Why James Bond?

According to the author of James Bond, “I wanted the simplest, dullest, plainest-sounding name I could find.” Through taking the prosaic name from the author of a book on the Birds of the West Indies. “Exotic things would happen to and around him, but he would be a neutral figure – an anonymous, blunt instrument wielded by a government department,” Fleming had sought motivation.

Why James Bond?

Why James Bond?

The First Actor To Play The Spy Was American

Barry Nelson played a role in a one-hour live television show of Fleming’s first Bond book, Casino Royale, in 1954, as US native Jimmy Bond. It would have been eight years before the first (and much more famous) film representation of the British secret agent was produced by Sean Connery.

The First Actor To Play The Spy Was American

The First Actor To Play The Spy Was American

It Was Once 57

The late Sir Roger Moore closed on his pension when he made his seventh and final appearance as Bond in 1985’s A View To A Kill, about 12 years since he played a part in 1973’s Live And Let Die. In reality, when he announced he rescinded his screen license to kill in December 1985, he turned 58. Younger Bond? On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, Australian George Lazenby was 29. In his mid-20s, when he was first approached, Timothy Dalton turned the job down. His series appearance at 41.

It Was Once 57

It Was Once 57

He’s A Widower

It might be known, but it is most frequently overlooked that Bond marries the crime boss’s daughter Marc-Ange Draco, Teresa ‘Tracy’ Draco, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. He is left to lament her in subsequent films when Ernst Stavro Blofeld and Irma Bunt execute her in a drive-by shooting hours after the nuptials. Knew it already? Well, then you realized the wedding dress Diana Rigg wears in the 1969 movie is now in a series of Bond pieces at a Milan hotel, along with memorabilia from Fleming’s other fantasy novels smash success Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang?

He's A Widower

He’s A Widower

 

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