One Food You Need To Try In Every State

Published on 02/15/2021
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When it comes to the United States, each state has a signature dish that it’s known for. If you’re itching to try some truly delicious food, you may not have to travel very far. The local dishes came to be as a result of the history, geography, and people that make each state unique. You might be wondering – what’s the best way to try them all? Well, you can have a food-filled road trip across the country to satisfy your cravings for adventure and delicious food. So let’s find out what foods to eat in each state!

Alabama: White Barbecue Sauce

White barbecue sauce isn’t exactly the main meal – it normally accompanies all kinds of barbecued meats. From chicken and ribs to pulled pork, just about any meat will be amazing with the sauce slathered over it. The sauce is unique since it has mayonnaise added to it. That’s what gives it the white color. Combining mayonnaise with vinegar, spices, and other ingredients will give you the heavenly finished product: a tangy, white sauce that goes all the way back to 19235 and “Big Bob” Gibson’s family barbecues in Decatur, Alabama.

Alabama White barbecue sauce

Alabama White barbecue sauce

Arizona: Chimichanga

It’s still a mystery as to who invented chimichanga, but history has hinted that the dish originated in one of two Arizona cities: Tucson or Pheonix. Restaurant owners in both cities claim their relatives were the ones to deep-fry a burrito for the first time, but nothing is certain yet. However, there is one known fact. Some Arizonans want the “chimi” as their official state food. No matter where it was originated, the popular stuffed and deep-fried burrito is not going anywhere anytime soon.

Arizona Chimichanga

Arizona Chimichanga

Arkansas: Cheese Dip

No one could have guessed that cheese dip originated in Arkansas. In fact, many Texans don’t believe that’s the case, but it’s true. Little Rock, Arkansas is a location where cheese dip became the popular mealtime addition we know and love today. Blackie Donnelly, a former Texas ranger, and his wife, Margie, opened the Mexico Chiquito restaurant in Little Rock in 1935. They’re said to be the originators of the famous concoction that many Americans enjoy nowadays.

Arkansas Cheese dip

Arkansas Cheese dip

California: Avocados

While it’s not a cruffin, sourdough load, or french dip, avocado had ruled the coast of California for over a century now. You can spread it on toast in the morning, mix it into a fresh salad for lunch, and include it in a California roll for dinner. Nowadays, the Hass avocado that was created by California postman Rudolph Hass in the 1920s, makes up roughly 95% of the avocados that are grown in California.

California Avocados

California Avocados

Colorado: Rocky Mountain Oysters

Colorado is a rather strange place to find oysters when you think about it. So it makes sense that the Rocky Mountain oysters have nearly almost nothing to do with the famous seafood they’re named after. The “prairie oysters” are actually famous for their main ingredient – bull testicles. Rocky Mountain oysters are normally breaded and deep-fried, served with a side of fries. They might sound off-putting, but the appetizer originated from Western ranches and is now a delicacy in Colorado.

Colorado Rocky Mountain oysters

Colorado Rocky Mountain oysters

Connecticut: Hot Lobster Rolls

It’s no secret that the lobster roll is a popular dish in New England, but the way it’s made varies between states. The Connecticut-style roll involves a split-top hot dog bun, hot chunks of lobster meat, and a side of warm butter. That’s pretty much all you need. Sweet lobster mixed with the rich butter and savory bun – it’s heavenly. The result is the perfect dish to enjoy while spending time in Connecticut.

Connecticut Hot lobster rolls

Connecticut Hot lobster rolls

Delaware: Fries With Vinegar

It’s a tradition to go and get fries before heading to the beach in Delaware. However, the condiment of choice is not ketchup or any other dipping sauce. It’s apple cider vinegar. As a matter of fact, the popular Rehoboth Beach fries spot, Thrasher’s, is probably one place where you won’t get the option for ketchup at all – just vinegar. Don’t worry, the “right” way to eat fries in this state will make for a tasty experience.

Delaware Fries with vinegar

Delaware Fries with vinegar

Florida: Key Lime Pie

The famous Key Lime Pie is Florida’s state pie and is especially popular in the Florida Keys area – where it’s thought to originate from. However, it’s still popular everywhere else and is served in restaurants all across the nation. The sweet condensed milk, lime juice, and graham cracker crust just can’t be compared to anything else. Top it with some meringue or whipped cream and you’ve got yourself a treat that you’ll never get tired of.

Florida Key lime pie

Florida Key lime pie

Georgia: Peach Cobbler

Seeing as Georgia is the Peach State, it’s no surprise that it has many tasty peach dishes. All the same, the peach cobbler rises above all else. The homey dessert is the perfect way to end a Southern-style meal with friends and family. It’s often enjoyed dutch-oven style when camping. It’s believed that cobbler dishes originated on the trail, so it makes sense that eating a peach cobbler around a campfire is ideal.

Georgia Peach cobbler

Georgia Peach cobbler

Alaska: Wild Salmon

When the state can harvest almost 900 million pounds of salmon in a single season, you know that some of that fish is going to end up on the dinner table. With this production amount, it’s difficult not to think of the Last Frontier State when salmon is mentioned. It can be easy to find ways to eat Alaskan salmon. Grill it or bake it. Just add it to a salad or use it to make sushi. There really is no wrong answer when cooking salmon.

Alaska Wild salmon

Alaska Wild salmon

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