The Most Dangerous And Deadliest Water Creatures

Published on 03/25/2021
ADVERTISEMENT

These creatures roam the seas and waters all around the globe, maybe we have even seen a few. However, if we just had to go off looks we would never say they are as dangerous as they are. These are a few of the water’s deadliest creatures. In all their magnificence their harm is underestimated.

Stingray

The predator that is behind the death of the infamous Steve Irwin, “Crocodile Hunter.” In 2006 an Australian bull ray, which is one of the biggest species of stingrays, stung Steve Irwin which led to his death. Stingrays will never hunt or actively look to harm divers they only sting humans when they are stood on, it is their instinct to defend themselves. Their stings are incredibly painful and often fatal for humans.

Stingray

Saltwater Crocodile

One massive reptile and a massively dangerous one too. Saltwater crocodiles kill at least two individuals every year. They are considered the most dangerous animals in Australia, which truly explains just how dangerous they are as Australia is home to some of the deadliest animals, reptiles, and creatures overall. These crocs can weigh up to 1200 kilograms and are the biggest of their kind. What comes along with size? Power! Saltwater crocodile’s jaws are ten times stronger than that of a great white shark.

Saltwater Crocodile

Blue Octopus

These beautiful creatures are found in the waters between Japan and Australia, their rings change color instantly when they feel threatened. With a lifespan of two years, they do everything to survive for the entirety of it. They are super small being between 12 to 20 centimeters in size. Their venom contains the powerful neurotoxin tetrodotoxin which leads to heart failure, respiratory arrest, and nausea. If truly severe people can end up paralyzed, blind, and dead. The rings turn blue when the octopus feels targeted or threatened this is a sign to steer clear.

Blue Octopus

Stonefish

Extremely hard to find and see, with their impeccable camouflage, Stonefish are the most venomous of the sea. They look just like rocks. Their dorsal fins stand tall ready to inject any wondering foot that may just happen to stand on the seabed below. Their venom contains neurotoxins and the more one stands on it the more venom that is released. They have another defense mechanism that has only recently been found, a switchblade on their face. Without antivenom, a human can die within the hour.

Stonefish

Box Jellyfish

These almost transparent jellyfish can have 15 tentacles which can develop up to 10 feet long, these are then lined with thousands of cells that sting. These stinging cells are packed with toxins that attack the heart, skin cells, and nervous system. There is an antivenom however, the sting is so potent that the majority of people encounter heart failure or drown before making it to shore. Survivors may be in pain for weeks to come and

Box Jellyfish

Cone Snail

found in the tropical waters of the world these snails are easy to spot and even easier to avoid. Their shells give off a marbled appearance, they are found closer to shore and in shallower waters mainly by coral reefs or rock clusters. However, as enticing as they look steer clear of these 6inch brown and white cuties. Concealed beneath their shells are harpoon-like teeth which contain conotoxin- a dangerous venom. There is no antivenom for this just yet and they say you have enough time to smoke a cigarette before it kicks in and your nerves stop communicating with one another.

Cone Snail

Great White Shark

Great Whites are known to be the most dangerous sharks, especially towards humans. Great Whites are involved in the most shark attacks on humans and are most likely to do so. It is believed these creatures have been around for millions of years, between 34 to 56 million years. Great Whites are said to attack humans as they mistake them for potential food opportunities, they are viciously strong predators that are awake and active during the day too.

Great White Shark

Flower Urchin

This pretty urchin can be found in the Guinness Book of Records with the title, “most dangerous sea urchin.” It has earned this title in its entirety as its pointed and sharp spikes are not only super painful but super venomous. A sting from this creature is not only sore but has been shown to lead to paralysis, this can sometimes lead to death. Standing on any sea urchin is painful but this beauty just takes it a step further with its feisty sting.

Flower Urchin

Glaucus Atlanticus

Also referred to as the Blue Dragon these little sea slugs are super cool and cute but deadly. These magnificent creatures are super rare and have been classified as endangered. These special creatures float upside down and are carried along by currents and ocean winds. Do not let them fool you with all their beauty they are stingers, they store the venom of other venomous creatures that they eat in their finger-like cerata. Picking one up can result in a painful sting and symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, contact dermatitis and much much more.

Glaucus Atlanticus

Lionfish

This intriguing sea creature is small but dangerous, dynamite truly does come in small packages with a lionfish. The tea cup sized fish is white, red and zebra striped in appearance. It has an especially deadly sting and contains venom. The sting is known for being excruciatingly painful and after being stung one can expect nausea and respiratory issues.

Lionfish

[ sc name=”bottom-ad”]

Tiger Shark

These sharks swim closer to the shores than most other sharks and predominantly in tropical waters. The truth is that they enjoy the deeper waters but sharks find it easier to catch prey when closer to shore. Tiger sharks eat almost any and everything, they also swallow their catch whole. These sharks are known for deadly attacks on humans many of them result in death or loss of limbs.

Tiger Shark

Moray Eel

This creepy eel is the largest in the world, they usually swim in more shallow waters and close to coral reefs. These eels have two sets of toothed jaws which they use to capture prey by attacking the throat and dragging them. Their bite is powerful and painful. They are the only sea creature that use a second jaw more based in the throat to attack prey.

Moray Eel

Barracuda

Barracuda are known for their speed as they swim up to 25 miles per hour. These fish have sharp teeth, top speed and they usually swim in shoals- a site to see. They are not vicious and it is very unlikely that they will attack a human being, however, if they do the bite is for sure going to hurt. Attacks have left people without limbs and missing a few fingers.

Barracuda

Striped Surgeonfish

Beautiful, enticing, small but dangerous too. These fish are Indo-Pacific based but should not be interfered with as their spine contains venom. These venomous fish are of course important for the ecosystem and health of the ocean but venomous fish also have value when it comes to modern medicine. However, striped surgeonfish are being heavily exploited at the moment and may be at risk very soon.

Striped Surgeonfish

Needlefish

These fish can grow up to 1.4 meters long, they are not vicious and are not responsible for many deaths. However, they may not contain a venom, poison nor are they aggressive but they have needle-like teeth that pack a very strong bite. More than this they can become airborne, f;lying through the air and piercing anything in their way. They are found in tropical waters relatively close to shores.

Needlefish

Yellow Sea Anemone

Most sea anemones are harmless to humans but this one is certainly not. The effects on humans are not as bad as what they do to prey- their venom contains neurotoxins that paralyze prey which allows them to use their tentacles and move the prey towards their mouth. The only fish unharmed by this is, yes, Nemo. Clownfish use anemones to protect themselves from prey.

Yellow Sea Anemone

Oyster Toadfish

Imagine seeing this below your feet when you’re having a dip, scary is an understatement. These oyster toadfish have a venomous spine which is located on their first dorsal fin. The venom from their spine causes a stinging feeling which is said to feel just like a bee or wasp sting. They are found between Maine and Florida along the shores. They are camouflaged very well and thus attack their prey by surprise.

Oyster Toadfish

Titan Triggerfish

Whether they got their name because they are easily triggered we have no clue but these super funny-looking fish are aggressive. The Titan Triggerfish are the largest triggerfish that can grow up to 75 centimeters. Found in lagoons or reefs, these fish are biters however, they sometimes will simply swim at a threat just trying to push them out of their space.

Titan Triggerfish

Pufferfish

Pufferfish are also known as blowfish are found in subtropical and tropical waters. There are over 120 species of blowfish worldwide and they are extremely toxic. The majority of these fish have tetrodotoxin which as we know is deadly, it is more powerful than cyanide. Deadly to humans and other fish, one pufferfish has enough tetroxide to kill 30 people. Although eaten as a delicacy the wrong bite of these fish can kill almost in an instant which happens around the world every now and again.

Pufferfish

Flamboyant Cuttlefish

This cuttlefish is the only toxic one and is somewhat like the blue-ringed octopus. Gorgeous in appearance its flesh is poisonous to any that may choose to eat it. Scientists and researchers believe that it uses its colors to warn people and predators and try to keep them at bay. They store their venom under their tentacles in a beak that is  razor-sharp.

Flamboyant Cuttlefish

Sea Slugs

Sea slugs are found in the ocean but also washed up onto shores and anywhere near the beachfront. They are deadly to dogs and can really affect children and adults too. The slugs slurp up and store deadly poisons or chemicals which originally came from their prey or anything they may eat. They then utilize whatever poison they may have stored at a later stage.

Sea Slugs

Fire Coral

Although they are called coral, fire coral is actually a member of the jellyfish family- they attach themselves to the coral. You can either get stung by their nematocysts or you can get scratched by the skeleton of the coral. The sting is felt instantly and has been said to burn just like a jellyfish sting. The skeleton can cut and scrape but it depends on how close you were and how hard one knocked the coral.

Fire Coral

Stargazer

These highly camouflaged creatures hide beneath the sand and scuffle along, which means the odds of seeing them before being harmed are rather low. Accidentally stepping on one of these not only stings but slightly electrocutes a person. They do have a venom that can lead to nausea, bleeding, and swelling but the electrocution is a tad scarier- although not deadly.

Stargazer

Coral Reef Snake

There are about 50 different types of sea snake species that are mainly found in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. As members of the cobra family, they are roughly two meters long. Sea snakes are not aggressive and are most likely going to hide from humans. However, just three drops of their venom can kill 8 individuals and they can definitely get through your wetsuit, so keep away and do not risk getting too close as interesting as these creatures can be.

Coral Reef Snake

Portuguese Man-of-War

Dead or alive these creatures sting regardless. Their incredibly long tentacles are coated in nematocysts that are packed with venom and are supposed to be used to paralyze prey. Their stings are not strong enough to paralyze a human but they hurt, burn, and sting. They may just leave a mark but stinging can last hours sometimes days.

Portuguese Man-of-War

ADVERTISEMENT